Don’t Be A Mullet-Head Photographer

One of the biggest weaknesses of any small business is in its willingness to adopt a “mullet strategy” in its business plan: they are all business up front and all party in the back. In many cases, small businesses (especially wedding photographers) create a professional website with a few great images and start operations.

What is missing in the mullet strategy is the depth of experience of the business of photography. Too many photographers are hobbyists who not only lack the depth of photographic experience, but lack the depth of business experience to provide a full service to their clients and themselves. Continue reading Don’t Be A Mullet-Head Photographer

Ancient Chinese Secrets to Small Business Success

Do you ever see that one person in the office who always seems to be on top of everything? What is worse, they are all full of energy verve and happiness. Well, it isn’t a secret. You can pick your head up off the table, put that luggage away that you carry under your eyes and drink coffee because you want to instead of “you need to.”

It is the JOSH HUDSON GET YOUR SH*T TOGETHER WORKOUT. With just moments a day, you can be on top of your game.
Continue reading Ancient Chinese Secrets to Small Business Success

PRICING PHOTOGRAPHY FOR PROFIT

I have seen amazing photographers give their work away because of low self-worth. I have seen horrible photographers turn their wedding business into a used car dealership and “ego” their clients into a $5,000 wedding package.

I believe in offering fair value for services. If I have done my job, I will have images that the client will believe in. I will go home feeling that I was adequately paid for the effort I gave my bride and groom. I will be proud of my work, my business and myself.

A photographer that overcharges his work, based on his salesmanship and not his photographic ability incurs bad kharma and a while his bank account might grow, his soul becomes bankrupt. And this is true even if the clients never notice the difference. Continue reading PRICING PHOTOGRAPHY FOR PROFIT

The Zen of Photography

The Zen of Photography is a spiritual and holistic approach to creating images with light.

It is not important to be Buddhist to understand Zen or how it applies to photography. The philosophy is simple and the application is just as simple to grasp. All that is required is to develop patience, mindfulness, skillfulness, and an open mind.
Continue reading The Zen of Photography

The HOW And WHY To Hire A Wedding Photographer

Do a quick Google search and you will find dozens of articles on “how to shop for a wedding photographer.” What they all have in common is a firm belief that you should hire someone who is a professional and that you shouldn’t worry about cost. That is because most articles on how to search for wedding photographers are written by wedding photographers! Well, here is one photographer that is going to give you the “inside scoop!” Continue reading The HOW And WHY To Hire A Wedding Photographer

f/16 Rule: How To Get Perfect Exposure Without Metering

Even if you have a great light meter, there is some comfort in having the skills to know that your meter is in the right ball park. When you can work it out in your head, the chances between success and failure of a photograph is significantly reduced. Continue reading f/16 Rule: How To Get Perfect Exposure Without Metering

What Is An f/stop?

To give a mental image, imagine that you have to fill a cup of water. There are two ways in which you can fill it at the sink: 1) open up the faucet so that a lot of water fills it up quickly or 2) let the water drip for a long time and fill up the glass that way. A camera works in a very similar way: that camera either lets in a lot of light or adjusts the time light is allowed to hit the film plane.

How the camera measures the time of an exposure is easy. A shutter opens up for a moment and closes. This is called shutter speed. Shutter speeds can vary from the very fast (e.g. 1/8000 second) to very long (e.g. 1 minute).

What is more difficult to understand is how the camera determines the amount of light into the camera. This is determined by f/stop.

In a lens there is a device called a diaphragm (normally a series of adjustable leafs that make a smaller or larger opening in the lens). When more light is needed, the diaphragm is opened. When less light is needed the diaphragm is closed. f/stops measure the size of the opening, which photographers call the aperture.

So why are they called f/stops and how do they work?

Continue reading What Is An f/stop?